How We Approach Water Projects

 

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 50% of all of rural Nicaraguans don't have access to an improved water source.

So SuNica has set out, not to be the greatest well drilling outfit of all time, but to be exceptional at the social-engineering of water projects. We don't show up, dig a well, and leave. If we're going to facilitate a project that has life beyond our involvement, the people who're being helped should become so entrenched in the process they hardly feel as if they're being helped. 
 
Brian Fikkert of The Chalmers Center for Education says community developers need to make the "inherent assumption that the economically poor have knowledge, abilities, and insights to be stewards over their own communities." We strive to be experts at coaxing those inherent gifts from communities so they can embrace their own capabilities. This is a slower process than simply punching a well, but it leads to sustainability and community renewal. 
 

Our Current Project - San Carlos

 

Turn On The Water 2016 from Bradford T Productions on Vimeo.

 

The Problem: Everyone in this rural community drinks from what UNICEF calls an “unimproved water source.” That’s a fancy way of saying dirty water from shallow wells. This equates to a lot of sicknesses, wasted time, and, sometimes, death.
The Solution: A community-managed water distribution system. This includes a water tank, pipeworks to every home, and a deep well of clean, abundant water.
The Desired Impact: With clean water piped to each home, people's health will drastically improve. It will free up many hours currently spent fetching water, which San Carlos will be able to use to conduct business and educate its children.
Quote from Community: "Everybody is scared because the water levels have dropped. In three years there will be no water. It would be a wonderful thing to have water piped to our homes."

 

Completed Project - El Porvenir

 

The Problem: In this rural, sugar cane farming community a high number of men were developing and dying from Chronic Kidney Disease due to pesticides running off into their limited well water and the presence of 400 fecal coliforms per 100ml of water (you read that right; there was poop in the water).
The Solution: A community-managed water distribution system. This includes a water tank, pipeworks to every home, and a deep well of clean, abundant water.
The Desired Impact: With clean (fecal matter free) water piped to each home, people are saving on average 36 minutes/day by not having to fetch water and families are able to bathe and maintain better hygiene with this access to abundant water.
Quote from Community: "Many people had to walk 100, 200, 300, 500 meters every day to bring water. Sometimes they had to set aside a whole day of the week to go wash at the river. Now it's not like that. We have the advantage of washing at home and drinking clean water. The children are healthier. Thank God they have good hygiene because they get washed every day. "